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Station One

971 Milford-Warren Glen Road, Milford, NJ 08848

hollandtownshipfire@gmail.com

(908) 995 2220

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Holland Township Volunteer Fire Company, Inc. is dedicated in serving the citizens of Holland Township to prevent loss of life, personal injury, and destruction of property.

Station Two

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Located on route 627 Riegelsville-milford road

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Company Officers

Line Officers

Chief......................Tom Welsh

Deputy Chief...... Tom Dougherty

Assistant Chief.... Carl Knight

Captain.................. Steve Underhill

Captain,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Rich Davi

Lieutenant ........... Chris Collins

Lieutenant............ Mike Hiel

Lieutenant............ Keith Oppenheimer

Executive Officers

Bill Martin.............. President

Tony Roselle .........Vice President

Jerry Bowers...........Secretary

Mike Miller.............. Treasurer

Trustees

Mike Joyce

Chris Spitzer

Rich Davi

Pete Davis

Jerry Bowers

Bill Ethem

Gabby Underhill

 

 

 

 

Incident Command 15

Incident Command 15

Engine 15-3

Engine 15-3

Engine 15-2

Engine 15-2

Engine 15-1

Engine 15-1

Tender 15

Tender 15

Brush 15-1

Brush 15-1

Brush 15-2

Brush 15-2

2013 Group photo

HTVFC 2013 Titled.jpg
 
 
 
 
Ken Vogel speaking at the Station One Dedication Ceremony  July 16, 1983

Ken Vogel speaking at the Station One Dedication Ceremony  July 16, 1983

Our History

In early 1980, an assembly of township residents came together with the common concern that the expansion of residential population in Holland Township was indicative of the need of their own volunteer fire company. This common idea grew with support and its true need led to the formation of the Holland Township Volunteer Fire Company (HTVFC), which appropriately became an incorporated service on March 1, 1980.

To excite town interest, the first meeting was to held on a Thursday night and announcements were placed in the local Delaware Valley Newspaper and in Holland Township Elementary School’s weekly publication. The first meeting was a well attended success, and the committee formed, had therefore decided to proceed with structuring Holland Township’s first, volunteer fire company; with that, the necessary steps were taken to incorporate and a regular meeting site was secured. As well, at the first meeting the group voted to continue meeting on Thursday nights, and to hold the business meeting on the second Thursday of each month, leaving all other meeting nights devoted to training.

Mayor John DiSarro, head of the township committee, was also a charter member of the fire company; DiSarro’s involvement engendered the committee to initiate the fire-study commission, which was led by township residents’ Bill Herman, Bob Householder, as well as residents Martin Lawlor and William Riehl, both whom were Irvington Firefighters. Further aid and support came from the State’s Fire Marshal Office, which allowed the study of our townships’ needs for effective firefighting (i.e. knowing the towns building types and equipment to purchase). The commission’s concluding recommendation stated a need to be located at three different building sites; the main building was to be located in the vicinity of the Reigel Ridge hill, along Milford-Warren Glen Road (Route 519). In cooperation with Sol Bernard (the developer who proposed to build theGridley Circle development) the township acquired land for municipal use – hence, this became the site of the first station. The second suggested site was to be located, as an ancillary station, between Little York and Mount Pleasant; however, Milford Volunteer Fire Company had decided to locate their substation in that proximity, which filled this recommendations requirement. Lastly, in deciding to look at the third location, the committee chose a substation near Mount Joy, close to the Reigelsville, Pennsylvanian boarder. Therefore, the second station came to exist through the work of HTVFCs first president, Chuck Finkbohner, who arranged land that was donated by the Reigel Paper Company.

Next, having had acquired land for the firehouse and sparking volunteer interest in the community, came the paramount needs of having to acquire equipment and to then begin training. Fire trucks were of first interest, and having heard of two used fire trucks for sale at the East Brunswick Volunteer Fire Company, a group researched the trucks and decided to ask the township to purchase them. The acquisition of the first two fire engines, a Mack pumper and an International pumper, led two our current colors – since East Brunswick had used white, the ideology went that Holland Township, being the newest volunteer fire station, should be a little different – which is how we became the first fire company in Hunterdon County with white trucks.

The next purchase was an old oil truck which had had the capacity to carry 2800 gallons of water (when it was painted white and it had became known  as “Snowball,” because it looked like a giant snowball coming down the road). The next fire-vehicle purchase was a Dodge 4×4, which was made into brush truck by buying a skid unit (a transportable unit usually used for brush-fires). While acquiring equipment, our firehouse had not been completed during the initial first years and therefore, we needed a storage depot for trucks as well as the equipment. The first HTVFC Chief, Bill Larsen, had a small farm with a large barn where he allowed storage of some of the engines and equipment (while the rest was stored at the municipal garage) – hence, the fire house, was actually a barn on Route 614! However there was never a response from the barn.

During this time, training in fire-fighter efficacy became an important aspect. The first training was held at the East Brunswick fire house as memberswhere were instructed on the use of air packs and the procedure of entering a building. The fire company’s entrance into existence held parity with Hunterdon County’s initiation of a county fire school, as that HTVFC participated in some of the first classes offered; during this time our training occurred at different fire houses throughout the county since the first fire academy building in Annandale, had yet to be completed. To aid in experience, HTVFC began responding to calls with Milford and Bloomsbury Volunteer Fire Companies, thus acquiring real-life and first-hand knowledge on protocol, procedure, and the perspicacity needed to be an effective Fire Company. Of course, continuation in attending every class offered by Hunterdon Fire Academy occurred as well.

On July 16, 1983, a dedication ceremony was held for the new fire house, Station One. Station One had four bays – two facing, perpendicular to Route 519, and the two opposite facing were parallel to Andersen Road; as well, the original doors facing Route 519 were all glass, which allowed township residents, and passer-bys, to peek in (in term of resourcefulness, they were changed afterwards to more energy efficient doors). Station One also had a meeting room and an office on the South side and originally had an arch off of the north side, facing Andersen Road, which was to represent future expansion. Further, after the acquisition of land, in the Mt.Joy section of Holland, construction soon commenced there. In order to expound upon the current Station One, this subsequent Station Two, was developed for a more utilitarian purpose, and was completed and working nearly ten years after the initial incorporation.

The lull between initial use and construction our first and second fire houses, respectively, provided a time to replace the out-dated pre-owned equipment that was purchased in the company’s infancy. This process, along with many of the feats the HTVFC has undergone, could not have been accomplished if not for the HTVFCs Auxiliary – which was  formed when the need to hold fund –drives and –raisers to help with the monetary need required to purchase the new fire-engines and equipment, and aid (food, drinks, and moral support) to the fire-fighters at the scene of the call.  They have been a true partner in our endeavors as a volunteer fire company.

Now, here we are. The years keep going by and Holland’s all volunteer fire company keeps on humming, busily, along. As the equipment evolves and progresses, of course, its cost keeps going up. For example, in 1982 it cost some several hundred dollars to outfit a firefighter in their turnout gear (Helmet, Bunker Pants, Boots, and Coat), now it cost a couple thousand. Also, in the ideology of humor, SCBA (Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus) had the 1980’s cost of about $700.00 accompanied with masks that had leaked in outside air and air-tanks weighing an enormous amount – now, the masks are pressure-test fitted to each firefighter, the tanks weight about a quarter as much, and a unit cost about $10,000.00 each. In this manner, while people wander through and equipment changes, we still press on strong, tried, and true toHollandTownshipand all of its beloved residents.

As well, we are always looking for new members to become a firefighter, Contributing, and/or Fire-police member. As a totally volunteer company, we can always use the help of our community to keep us going. We still meet every Thursday night, so please stop by Station One and introduce yourself; hopefully you’ll become a member just as hundreds of dedicated residents have done since our conception in 1980.

 
We worked at the municipal garage to put the first truck into service. Here Chief Bill Larson, Fireman Bob Herbstzuber, and Captain Dave Johnston repair the hose reel 

We worked at the municipal garage to put the first truck into service. Here Chief Bill Larson, Fireman Bob Herbstzuber, and Captain Dave Johnston repair the hose reel 

Our tanker was a converted oil truck know a "Snowball".

Our tanker was a converted oil truck know a "Snowball".

15-61 is ready for service

15-61 is ready for service

Our four wheel drive pumper and utility truck were soon added. They are no longer in service.

Our four wheel drive pumper and utility truck were soon added. They are no longer in service.

Our first trucks were stored in a shed on Bill Larson's farm before they went into service.

Our first trucks were stored in a shed on Bill Larson's farm before they went into service.

Our1962 Mack shown here at a drill with East Brunswick where we purchased the truck.

Our1962 Mack shown here at a drill with East Brunswick where we purchased the truck.

Whispering Pines

Welcome to Whispering Pines in Holland Township, NJ

Welcome to Whispering Pines in Holland Township, NJ

 

908-328-5469

Located in rural Holland Township, NJ, Whispering Pines is minutes away from Milford, Frenchtown and Phillipsburg in New Jersey, and from Easton and Upper Bucks County in Pennsylvania.  The "Pines" is affiliated with the Holland Township Volunteer Fire Company, which benefits from all income generated by the facility.

Whispering Pines offers:

·         Seating capacity for 140 persons; maximum of 360, auditorium style

·         A kitchen with refrigerator and freezer, warming/convection oven

·         Steam table

·         Wet bar (patrons provide their own alcoholic beverages)

·         Hardwood dance floor

·         Space for band or DJ

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Whispering Pines in the beginning

Pool Fills

 
 

908 328 1181

We will fill or top off your swimming pool with clean clear water